Welcome to 2020!

I did notice when I looked through the content of my websites is that my "web pages" were more like blog entries than actual web pages. Web pages usually contain unique content that expresses an idea in some decent level of detail. Were you to print out a good web page, it would likely take 6 to 60 pieces of paper to print out. Most of my web pages would only take 1 or 2 - that's why I thought the venerable Web Log (blog) format would be suitable. [More]

Astronomy Log: 2019006

My son Aaron, my wife April and I all went up to Balsam Lake Provincial Park to help in a night sky presentation by the park staff. The intention was we would bring our telescopes and help out with the presentation and then let visitors observe through our telescopes afterwards. In the end, that's what happened, however the mosquito population overwhelmed us and Jupiter was the only target that got observed. [More]

Astronomy Log: 2019005

It was a nice clear night with a light breeze and my son Aaron and I had just finished watching a basketball game (our Toronto Raptors are in the NBA finals!), so I decided to bring out my 8” SCT to have a look at Jupiter which was situated in the south east over the neighbouring houses. [More]

Astronomy Log: 2019004

Happy Cinco de Mayo! We finally had a decent chance to do some observing, so my son Aaron and I cooked up a scheme that we’d go to sleep early, then get up at 2AM, jump in the car already packed with gear, drive to our remote observing site in Springwater and get some images of Jupiter and Saturn. [More]

Arch Linux

My favourite distribution of Linux is Arch Linux. The reason? It lets you choose exactly what components you'd like to install - nothing more. Unlike pre-packaged distros like Ubuntu, Arch doesn't come with an office suite, a graphics editor, various games, tons of GUI tools, etc. Oh, you can install all of these things. As a matter of fact, you can make Arch look and behave exactly like Ubuntu, or any other distro. But that's not what I'm into. [More]

My Telescopes

I got my first telescope during the Christmas of 1979. It was a spindly little 40mm reflector from Sears and it came with just one eyepiece. It’s wobbly little wooden legs and plastic mount could barely keep the optical tube steady long enough to get a decent peek, but I managed to use that scope to explore the wonderfully cratered surface of the Moon, to see the moons of Jupiter and bask in the splendour of the rings of Saturn. That scope opened the world of astronomy to me. [More]

Astrophotography

The following article was written by me in September, 2000. I thought it would be great to put it up here for posterity, as digital cameras were just becoming the norm, so the focus of my article is using film cameras. Imagine! (BTW: I'm still no good at astrophotography!) [More]

Microscopy

I've always had a microscope, but its always been a cheap, toy type. Some have had metal bodies, but all have had horrible plastic optics, clunky focusing mechanisms, and wobbly stages to mount your slides on. My son Aaron has recently become very interested in microbiology, so we decided to get a better microscope. [More]